Catalog of Courses

Displaying 1 - 34 of 34 classes.

Browse below to find courses being taught at EMCC during current and upcoming semesters. Courses are listed in alphanumeric order based on course subject prefix and number. You may click on the subject listings in the left filter menu to narrow results by subject. You may search for current class offerings available for enrollment by clicking on the link under each course. Click here to view the official current and archived book versions of the EMCC Academic Catalog.

An introduction to crime and society's responses to it. Examines the nature and causes of crime, the criminal law, constitutional safeguards, and the organization and operation of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, jails, prisons, probation and parole departments, and community corrections agencies. Covers the history of the criminal justice system, terminology and career opportunities. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: SB GE Codes
AJS1101

Covers philosophy of legal sanctions and historical development from the common law to modern American criminal law, classifications of crimes, elements of and parties to crimes, general definition of crimes, common defenses utilized. Includes specific offenses and the essential elements of each offense. Prerequisites: None.

Focus on changing the distribution of crime opportunities rather than offender motivation. Topics include application of situational crime prevention strategies, problem-oriented crime control approaches, hot spots policing, and crime prevention through environmental design. Prerequisites: None.

Introduces and explores ethical issues and the justice system. Focuses on ethics and the law, the police, courts and corrections. Reviews ethical theory, concepts and practices as they relate to administration of justice. Explores issues of how media/social media shape ethics. Encourages critical thinking and value decision making in criminal justice system situations. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: HU GE Codes

Note: This course has differences between current terms. Please see advisement for specific information.

The study of serial killers, mass murderers and their victims. Examines the history and frequency of these crimes, profiles the killers and their victims, explores theories of causation, and discusses the problems and techniques of investigation, prosecution, punishment, and prevention. Prerequisites: None.

A practical insight into the rules of evidence to include how to recognize evidence: the general rules governing admissibility of evidence; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; the use of documentary evidence, written memoranda, photographs, recordings and electronic surveillance; corpus delicti; opinion evidence, circumstantial evidence, evidential privileges. Prerequisites: None.

Overview of effective communication for criminal justice agencies. Covers the communication process and flow. Written communication emphasized with report writing, including characteristics of reports and field notes, and the importance and uses of each. Form, style, and procedures for writing various reports, including elements of composition, required substance, proper and improper conclusions, and descriptions of persons and property. Prerequisites: None.

An examination of the U.S. Constitution as it relates to the law enforcement function. Includes statutory law and judicial decisions governing the areas of arrest, search and seizure, interrogations and confessions, self-incrimination and other constitutional guarantees. Required in AJS curriculum. Prerequisites: None.

Examines the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency to the present. Including but not limited to the history, jurisdictions, terminology, procedures, and institutions of the juvenile justice system. Prerequisites: None.

Study of deviance, society's role in defining behavior; theories of criminality and the economic, social, and psychological impact of crime; relationships between statistics and crime trends. Examines crime victimization and the various types of crime and categories of offenders. Required in the AJS curriculum. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: SB GE Codes

Theories of procedures and methods of operations of public police with emphasis on discretionary powers available to the working police officer. Career opportunities and current trends in law enforcement presented. Prerequisites: None.

Examines the history and development of correctional theories and institutions. Prerequisites: None.

Victimology, the criminal justice system, techniques of crisis intervention and management, and the importance of a multicultural and global perspective. Includes violent crimes, sexual assault, family violence, post-traumatic stress disorder, the role of substance abuse, developing effective coping skills of victims and responders, appropriate community resources, and the cultural responsiveness of the justice system.

General Education Designations: C, SB GE Codes

Concerned with the understanding of procedural criminal law. Examines the processes and procedures followed by law enforcement, attorneys, and the courts in the apprehension and prosecution of criminal offenders. Examines the rationale underlying major court holdings impacting the criminal justice process, the procedural requirements that stem from these holdings and their effect on the daily operations of the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: None.

Examination, recognition and understanding of community problems; community action programs; methods of coping with human behavior, victimology, conflict and communication; ethnic and minority cultures and environments; the community and relationships with the criminal justice system. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: SB GE Codes

Introduction to the theory of criminal investigation. Examines crime scene procedures, case preparation, interviewing, and basic investigative techniques. Prerequisites: None.

Courtroom demeanor and protocol. Role and primary functions of witness and legal counsels. Prerequisites: None.

Cooking techniques and preparation of breakfast items, salads, sandwiches, and dressings. Theory and practice of production of egg, pasta, cheeses, and fruit dishes, canapes and hors d`oeuvre creations. Study of lettuces, fruits, grains, cheeses and dressings as components of salads and sandwiches. Prerequisites: None.

Introductory principles and skills for professional cooking. Introduces organizational structure of kitchen staff in different types of kitchens. Includes basic principles of safety and sanitation, equipment and utensil use, French cooking terms, recipe use, measuring techniques, identification and use of seasoning agents, and basic cooking methods applied to stocks, sauces and soups, vegetables, starches, entrees, and eggs. Emphasis on practical experiences in a commercial kitchen. Prerequisites: None.

Cooking techniques and preparation of cold food items to include salads, sandwiches, hors dÂȘoeuvres, and appetizers. Preparation of common breakfast foods found in restaurant operations. Prerequisites: None.

Principles and techniques for preparation, storage, and serving of bakery products. Includes breads, cakes, pies, pastry, cookies, fillings, and icings. Emphasis on practical experiences in a commercial bakery. Prerequisites: None.

Students must have or obtain a current Maricopa County Arizona Food Handler's Certificate prior to food handling activities to successfully participate in the course. Recommend students complete this prior to the start of the course.

Focuses on the theory and practice of food service safety and sanitation. Emphasis on understanding and applying the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) concept. Reviews legal elements of food service sanitation based on requirements and recommendations of regulatory authorities. Focuses on stewarding as an important kitchen support service with emphasis on appropriate practices and principles of receiving food and product rotation. Prerequisites: None.

Baking principles to include detailed study of ingredients, heat transfer, and recipe conversions. Basic business operations for a retail bakery including bakery product line and floor plan design. Prerequisites: None.

Basic skills necessary to understand and utilize cost controls. Focus on measurements, recipe costing and yield analysis. Application of systems and practices for efficient food purchasing, storage, production, budgeting and inventory. Prerequisites: None.

Advanced principles and techniques in commercial baking and dessert preparation. Focus on fine pastries with European flair and on desserts served in better hotels, restaurants, and resorts. Preparation of macaroons, tarts, puff pastries, specialty cakes, and desserts such as Bavarian creams, mousses, custards, souffles, crepe desserts, and flammeries. Preparation and use of sauces, techniques for using nuts and chocolate, and exploration of new recipes.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CUL113, or permission of Program Director.

The preparation of classical and artisan breads using advanced production techniques and skills. Classic breakfast pastry, with the production of laminated doughs, sweet doughs, and rich yeast doughs to include Danish, croissant, puff pastry, brioche, and other international classics. Completion of edible centerpieces made out of various styles of bread. Prerequisites: None.

Students must have or obtain a current Maricopa County Arizona Food Handler`s Certificate prior to food handling activities to successfully participate in the course. Recommend students complete this prior to the start of the course.

Focuses on theory and practice of operating a casual dining room; includes set-up and clean-up, food and beverage service, proper etiquette, point-of-sale operation and presenting guest checks. Emphasis on service techniques, including buffet and banquet set-ups, and customer accommodations. Prerequisites: None.

Gourmet international food preparation applied to restaurants. Review principles of sanitation and safety. Explores history and customs, serving styles, and preparation techniques of foods unique to selected international cultures. Emphasis on practical cooking experiences in a restaurant kitchen. Cultures to include, but not limited to: Italian, German, Oriental, Middle Eastern, and Spanish.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in CUL105, or permission of Program Director.

American regional food preparation applied to restaurants. Review principles of sanitation and safety. Explores history and customs, serving styles, and preparation techniques of foods unique to selected American regions. Emphasis on practical cooking experiences in a restaurant setting. American regions to include, but not limited to: Southern, Cajun/Creole, New England, Mid-West, and Pacific Coast.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in CUL105, or permission of Program Director.

Principles of French cooking applied to restaurant kitchens. Includes review of safety and sanitation principles, orientation to French culture, use of French terms and recipes, and reading French menus. Emphasis on practical experiences in preparing French meals in a restaurant kitchen. Introduces preparation of appetizers, hors d'oeurves, charcuterie items, pastries, and desserts.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in CUL105, or permission of Program Director.

Focuses on the basic steps of the catering process in a commercial food setting. Includes an overview of safety and sanitation principles. Emphasizes practical experiences in booking and record keeping, function planning, ordering, production, and service set-up and breakdown for both in-house and off-premise catered events.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in CUL105, or permission of Program Director.

Advanced techniques for the production of special occasion cakes, including initial design work, baking, icing, and finishing components.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CUL113 or permission of Program Director.

Advanced production techniques for plated desserts, frozen desserts, modern and classical gateaux, petits fours, and chocolates.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in CUL113 or permission of Program Director.

Administrative procedures and personnel relationships: Management of materials costs, record keeping and legal aspects of food and beverage service operations. Prerequisites: None.

Equivalent course(s): FON206 & HRM206