Catalog of Courses

Displaying 1 - 40 of 378 classes.

Browse below to find courses being taught at EMCC during current and upcoming semesters. Courses are listed in alphanumeric order based on course subject prefix and number. You may click on the subject listings in the left filter menu to narrow results by subject. You may search for current class offerings available for enrollment by clicking on the link under each course. Click here to view the official current and archived book versions of the EMCC Academic Catalog.

Tax reporting for payroll, sales, and personal property. Prerequisites: None.

Fundamental theory of accounting principles and procedures. Prerequisites: None.

Continuation of the fundamental theory of accounting principles and procedures, including interpretation of general purpose financial statements.

Prerequisites: ACC111 with a grade of "C" or better, or permission of Department or Division.

Understanding of fundamental accounting principles and mastery of an accounting information systems including the general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable and payroll. Prerequisites: None.

Theory and practice of accounting for individual taxation. Prerequisites: None.

Development and analysis of accounting information for managerial planning and control.

Prerequisites: A grade of "C" or better in (ACC111 and ACC112), or ACC211, and (CIS105 or permission of Department or Division).
ACC2202

Introduction to the uses of accounting information for internal and external purposes with emphasis on financial statement analysis.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in (ACC111 or ACC211) or [(ENG101 or ENG107) and MAT151 and CRE101] or (appropriate District English, Reading, and Math placement).

Introduction to the uses of accounting information for internal and external purposes with emphasis on analysis for use by management.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ACC230.

Survey course designed to introduce students and cadets to the Department of the Air Force (DAF) and the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC). The course allows students and cadets to examine general aspects of the DAF, leadership fundamentals, service benefits, and opportunities for officers. The course also lays the foundation for becoming an Airman or Guardian by outlining our heritage and values. As a foundational course, this course provides a historical perspective such as lessons on war and US military, DAF operations, principles of war, and airpower. Prerequisites: None.

Survey course designed to introduce students and cadets to the Department of the Air Force (DAF) and the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC). The course allows students and cadets to examine general aspects of the DAF, leadership fundamentals, service benefits, and opportunities for officers. The course also lays the foundation for becoming an Airman or Guardian by outlining our heritage and values. As a foundational course, this course provides a historical perspective such as lessons on war and US military, DAF operations, principles of war, and airpower. Prerequisites: None.

A survey course designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. Students and cadets will learn that there are many layers to leadership, including aspects that do not always come to mind. Such things include listening, understanding themselves, being a good follower, and problem solving efficiently. Students and cadets will apply these leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management. Students and cadets should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. Prerequisites: None.

A survey course designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. Students and cadets will learn that there are many layers to leadership, including aspects that do not always come to mind. Such things include listening, understanding themselves, being a good follower, and problem solving efficiently. Students and cadets will apply these leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management. Students and cadets should demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. Prerequisites: None.

Physical training component of Air Force ROTC. Covers topics of immediate or special interest to a faculty member and students. Prerequisites: None.

AES294 may be repeated for credit.

Introduction to the study of the African-American experience. Interdisciplinary approach includes historical underpinnings; population and cultural characteristics; social, economic, and political issues; and implications for the future. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: C GE Codes

Basic concepts and applications of artificial intelligence (AI), including AI project cycles. Focus on issues surrounding AI including ethics, bias, culture, regulations, and professional expectations. Prerequisites: None.

Introduction to machine learning concepts and Python applications, including data acquisition, supervised and unsupervised learning, and data modeling.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIM100, CIS156, and MAT206.

Fundamental concepts in Natural Language Processing (NLP) and text processing. Focus on knowledge and skills necessary to create a language recognition application.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIM110.

Understand and apply the basic techniques to process images using OpenCV and Python libraries.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIM110.

Fundamentals of artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to support business solutions.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIM210 and AIM220.

Focus on how a social issue is explored, brought through the Artificial Intelligence (AI) Project cycle, and delivered as a solution using the different domains of AI, including computer vision and natural language processing.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIM210 and AIM220.

Introductory course in workplace safety training, including an overview of critical safety policies, procedures, and practices that help prevent injuries and keep the workplace safe and productive. Prerequisites: None.

Introductory course into the practice of modern maintenance operations. Includes: safely and correctly using maintenance tools (e.g., hand tools, power tools), measuring instrumentations (e.g., tape, caliper, micrometer) and reading various engineering documents (e.g., blueprints, flowcharts, parts diagrams). Use and convert units in System International (SI) and imperial. Basic discussion of industrial safety procedures, machine operations, troubleshooting, failure analysis, modern maintenance principles, rigging, workplace organization, and records keeping. Prerequisites: None.

Introductory course in how to transmit, measure, calculate, and work safely with rotational mechanical equipment. Hands-on assembly, alignment, maintenance, and troubleshooting of mechanical power transmission systems and components e.g., belts, bearings, chains, dynamometers, gears, pulleys, couplings, bushings, and sprockets. Introduction to lubricant and grease types, their standards, safety, and application. Prerequisite: None.

Introductory course in the principles of hydraulic system operation, components construction, maintenance, troubleshooting, and operation, as well as the role of the individual components in an operating hydraulic system. Includes hydraulic fitting and seals, accumulators, cylinders, directional control valves (DVC), relief valves, check valves, pumps, filters, hoses, and a variety of hydraulic control circuits. Prerequisites: None.

Introductory course in the principles of pneumatic system operation, components construction, maintenance, troubleshooting, and operation, as well as the role of the individual components of an operating pneumatic system. Includes pneumatic fitting, seals, accumulators, actuator/cylinders, Directional Control Valves (DCV), manifolds, relief valves, check valves, pumps, filters, regulators, dryers, and common pneumatic control circuits. Prerequisites: None.

An introductory course in Alternating Current (AC) and Direct Current (DC) electric theory. Includes electric circuits using resistors, capacitors and inductors. Also includes solenoids, relays, transformers, basic DC and AC motors, circuit protection devices and a variety of switches. Prerequisites: None.

Introductory course in AC and DC power electronic theory. Includes power supplies, power conditioning, solid-state power devices, and power control circuits. Also includes proximity sensors, analog thermal sensors, control feedback loops, and the setup and operation of Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs).

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIT125, or permission of Instructor.

Introductory course in Process Control Systems design, operation, and tuning of Proportional, Integral, Derivative (PID) controllers for regulating flow, temperature, pressure, and level of industrial process variables. Includes manual control, feedback control, automated controls, analysis process setup, operate, and troubleshooting processes of control systems. Also includes typical Pipe and Instrument Diagram (P&IDs) symbols and tags along with the development of a basic P&ID drawing.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIT125, or permission of Instructor.

An introductory course in DC, single-phase AC, and 3-phase AC electric motors and motor control circuits. Includes electric motor control circuit components, motor control circuit applications, sequence circuits, and timer circuits.

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in AIT125, or permission of Instructor.

Fundamental principles of working safely with robots, and applications and trends in industrial robotics. Includes types of robots, axes and coordinate systems, programming and operating robots. Incorporates end effectors and collaborative robots.

A grade of C or better required in all Prerequisites. Prerequisites or Corequisites: AIT100 or permission of Instructor.

An introduction to crime and society's responses to it. Examines the nature and causes of crime, the criminal law, constitutional safeguards, and the organization and operation of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, jails, prisons, probation and parole departments, and community corrections agencies. Covers the history of the criminal justice system, terminology and career opportunities. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: SB GE Codes
AJS1101

Covers philosophy of legal sanctions and historical development from the common law to modern American criminal law, classifications of crimes, elements of and parties to crimes, general definition of crimes, common defenses utilized. Includes specific offenses and the essential elements of each offense. Prerequisites: None.

Focus on changing the distribution of crime opportunities rather than offender motivation. Topics include application of situational crime prevention strategies, problem-oriented crime control approaches, hot spots policing, and crime prevention through environmental design. Prerequisites: None.

Introduces and explores ethical issues and the justice system. Focuses on ethics and the law, the police, courts and corrections. Reviews ethical theory, concepts and practices as they relate to administration of justice. Explores issues of how media/social media shape ethics. Encourages critical thinking and value decision making in criminal justice system situations. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: HU GE Codes

The study of serial killers, mass murderers and their victims. Examines the history and frequency of these crimes, profiles the killers and their victims, explores theories of causation, and discusses the problems and techniques of investigation, prosecution, punishment, and prevention. Prerequisites: None.

Examines current issues, techniques and trends in the Criminal Justice System. Prerequisites: None.

General Education Designations: SB GE Codes

A practical insight into the rules of evidence to include how to recognize evidence: the general rules governing admissibility of evidence; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; the use of documentary evidence, written memoranda, photographs, recordings and electronic surveillance; corpus delicti; opinion evidence, circumstantial evidence, evidential privileges. Prerequisites: None.

Overview of effective communication for criminal justice agencies. Covers the communication process and flow. Written communication emphasized with report writing, including characteristics of reports and field notes, and the importance and uses of each. Form, style, and procedures for writing various reports, including elements of composition, required substance, proper and improper conclusions, and descriptions of persons and property. Prerequisites: None.

An examination of the U.S. Constitution as it relates to the law enforcement function. Includes statutory law and judicial decisions governing the areas of arrest, search and seizure, interrogations and confessions, self-incrimination and other constitutional guarantees. Required in AJS curriculum. Prerequisites: None.

Examines the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency to the present. Including but not limited to the history, jurisdictions, terminology, procedures, and institutions of the juvenile justice system. Prerequisites: None.